Science Principles

0 thoughts on “Science Principles

  • At school we do lots of real science , including like minibeast searching, we did it today!

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  • The principles help me enjoy science because I like testing how far things go and also doing science activities.

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  • The science principles help me to learn because they let me enjoy science. I have had a experience of real science when l went to the science museum and put my hand in a tube and press a button, then you put headphones on and listen to it next write down on a piece of paper and if you got more than 4 points you got a prize.It was so fun!

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  • When I was stitching my first ever doll it was super fun.I had so much fun.It was so exciting too.When I was at builder bear workshop when they were stuffing the bear I chose I said eureka. At my house when I was doing real science with my brother it was the most inspiring moment of my life!Today in class I had an idea to design stars for the christmas letter box and we all did!

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  • Real Science:
    At school we get the opportunity to test things on real experiences. For example, in Year 5, Jack’s mum came in and did experiments with us so we go to test which objects have a certain ingredient by using a specific light, not the ordinary light. Another experience was in Year 5 , we got to test how quick the sugar will dissolve depending on the water temperature.

    Child-centred Science:
    Child-centred science is about how the children come up with there own ideas, so for instance the science project. We had to base our project on a person who invented something scientific so Alexander Graham Bell, Archimedes, Benjamin Franklin and many more.Another example was in Year 3, we got to design an investigation with magnets.

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  • Real

    At Cathedral School I am provided with loads of real ways to do science. The teacher gives me lots of experiments to do. These are some or the things that make science so real for me. On our trip to the Science Museum I felt like the school had really achieved providing us real science.

    Child-Centred

    At Cathedral School I am given an opportunity to do child-centred science. In Year 4, we were given a project to do about science. We were told that we could do the project about any scientist or discovery in science. I thought that the school had given us the opportunity to do lots of child-centred learning.

    Inspiring and Exciting

    In almost every science lesson the work is inspiring and exciting. This happens especially when we learn a bit about a theory or famous scientist and then we get to do our own experiments based on that. I found the project we did in Year 4 inspired me to do more experiments.

    At Cathedral School the Science Principles are followed very well by all the teachers.

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  • Science. My favourite subject ( not because I share the same first name as Albert Einstein by the way). We do a lot of hands on experiments in Class 4. Many thanks to Miss Hatherly and Margaret. They should get best teacher award. Ask me the question, “is that a Rolls Royce jet engine over there?” I can answer it ( during the subject of sound I heard one overhead ). Inspiring? Awe inspiring. Exciting? Of course.

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  • Inspiring and exciting: An example will be when people from the science lab in Kings Cross. My favourite part was the plastic surgery.

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  • I love science at school because we learn things that I didn’t even know about. I didn’t know that vibrations help you hear.
    I didn’t know that when you play a instrument hard, it gets loud and when you put one of your thumbs on a drum
    and bang the drum really hard with a really stiff drumstick the sound is quieter because of the vibrations.
    I never knew vibrations travelled from your ear to your brain.

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  • SCIENCE IS AWESOME, AMAZING, ARTISTIC, CREATIVE AND EXCITING!!!!!!!!!!! SCIENCE IS THE BEST SUBJECT EVER!!!!!!! I wonder if Miss Hatherly can teach about space and time and how it works because I’m really interested in space and time. The only thing I know about space and time is that if there was no space there would be no time but I don’t know if there is time in space. Miss Hatherly has to include physics and figure out the meaning of time and space and learn ALOT about it if she wants to teach us about that.

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  • Science help me when I want to know something like how light travels. In science I can do an experiment to help me boost my confidence in how light travels.

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  • Today we all went to Red Cross Garden and we went on an invertebrate hunt.There were so many little creatures.This is an example of real science.Now I know so much about the difference between invertebrates and vertebrates.

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  • Real science is when students like me and all my classmates have access to practical experiments such as the light experiment we did in science. It has to be an experiment that can relate to everyday life such as the light going in a straight line. I really enjoy doing practical experiments as I find it really fun.

    Another example is an experiment that we did this year with Mr Rojas. It was to see if light went in a straight line. There were several examples to prove that light shines in a straight line ( such as disco lights ) but we did an experiment to make sure that this factual information was correct. We got 4 pieces of black card and put a hole through three ( to let the light go through) and the last one had a target in the middle. The light had to go through to the target and hit the centre. The experiment proved that light went into a straight line. This is real science because really it just proves what the fact is.

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  • Child Centred

    I think it is a good idea that every child in Cathedral School gets to do science experiments because it is great fun using different objects and finding out what works and what does not work. It is great for children to investigate because they are more confident and gain more experience in their work.

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  • I think science at this school is amazing! I never knew about these principles but now I do I understand how the teachers ensure science is great. Today in class we went to Red Cross Gardens to do some minibeast hunting. It was really fun as we got to explore different habitats at the same time. This is an example of real science, the principle that brings learning alive. I really enjoyed making the science projects last year because you got to do what you wanted to do with it instead of what your teacher wanted to do. You never actually showed them it until you had completed it. Child-centred science includes things when the teacher gives you something to base your work around so say one person did their work about an inventor and someone else did their work about plants. Inspiring and exciting is my favourite principle because you get to do really fun things like experiments.

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  • One afternoon last year, one of my friends’ mum came into school to teach us about science. She is a neurobiologist and works at Kings College. Neurobiology is the study of cells of the nervous system and the organisation of these cells into functional circuits that process information and mediate behaviour.
    First, Esther showed us a quick slideshow explaining what she does for a living and what we would be doing. It was really interesting and I couldn’t wait to get going.
    I have never really stopped to think about the brain and how it works so this was all very new to me.
    Esther and her colleagues set up two stations. On one, we looked through a microscope at fish and chick embryos in detail. On the second station, we acted as brain surgeons. There was a fake brain and we stuck bits of plasticine in the holes. The plasticine represented ‘sick’ cells. The scientists put the brain in a dark space and we attempted to pick out those cells with tweezers. I found this station more enjoyable than the other one.
    The scientists made very complicated ideas about neurobiology simple and fun – for example with things that glowed in the dark. It was amazing to see different parts of the brain and to think about how the science that they were showing us is used, in the real world, to help people people in hospitals and also in nature. I found it completely fascinating.

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  • To me real science is the science that is natural and surrounds us in the world today. Without this real science I think we wouldn’t be able to live, its scientifically impossible because without our body organs we cannot survive and without other important science we would not live, such as the water cycle; we shall not be able to quench our thirst so we would die of thirst and there are also many other parts of science we could not life without. I think there are benefits to natural science as well because we are able to learn about the most interesting things on earth even luckier we are able to learn it at this school. At this school all the teachers and staff ensure that we have the equipment we need to be able to learn properly. But I think science is not all fun and nice because thousands of people die from science, even right now people are dying from diseases and cures need to still be found, but here at school we pray for those people in the Zimbabwe pray which is very important to me.

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  • My example of real science is among one of my favourite lessons in was last year when we measured the difference between the planets using toilet roll and different fruits. In the lesson, we measured the difference between the planets in our solar system after watching a video helping us understand. Then we planned how we could conduct the experiment; we finally decided to use different sized fruits to represent the different sizes of planets, ranging from a grape to a watermelon. The toilet roll represented one hundred kilometres. Our experiment was conducted in the Juniors playground, due to its large size and the limited space in the classroom. We assigned jobs to certain members of the class and saw if we could do the test with no teacher instructions at all. We started off placing down the sun [represented by a melon]. Next we proceeded to rolling out toilet roll to show the difference between the sun and Mercury -which is closest to the sun- and did this over and over until we did all of the planets.
    This experiment was centred around us children because the test was our idea which we brainstormed in a different lesson in class. Also, the class was given the opportunity to run the investigation ourselves with barely any teacher support, which also helped our cooperation as a class.
    Our experiment was very inspiring because it taught us a lot about astronomy in our solar system which made a lot of members from our class think about the amazing people astronomers are and the brilliant things they do. It was also a chance to do a team bonding exercise with our class and people we don’t normally talk to. A lot of my class members have bonded over this experiment because of either their love of science/astronomy or socializing after not doing so often. It was exciting because it was fun to not sit in a classroom and be told stuff but to go out and find it out ourselves in the form of an investigation. It was unusual but still exciting to lead the test ourselves assigning roles to different students to have some order to the experiment.
    To me this experiment changed the view on science since it was one of our first major investigations in school because we had never done anything of the sort in other years in my school life. This strengthened my interest in science by a significant amount and without it I wouldn’t love science as much as I do now if it weren’t for it.

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  • Real Science
    Real Science, to me, is when you make a theory and put it into practise which is why you need a real source to do Real Science. This includes things like:
    Learning about Planets
    Learning about your Diet
    Learning about Animals.
    When I was in Class 5, my class and I did an experiment where we worked out the difference between the planets. We needed toilet paper and different sizes of fruit. The reason we needed these things is because we laid down the toilet paper (This represented the distance) and put the different sizes of fruit down according to where they roughly were in the Solar System.(The different sizes of the fruit showed the different sizes of the Planets.) This is an example of Real Science.

    Child Centred Science
    Child Centred Science, to me, is when a child gets given a piece of work to do but the way they decide to do it and what they decide to do it on is up to them.
    This includes things like:
    Projects
    I did my Science Project on Penicillin. I was the one who chose the topic and I chose the layout of the project (Which was on a word document which I printed out and put into a booklet.) This is an example of Child Centred Science as other children decided to do the task different to the way that I did it.
    Inspiring and Exciting Science
    Inspiring and Exciting Science is when you do a Subject or Experiment that includes you using Practical Skills.
    An example of this is when we tested to see if sugar dissolved quicker in hot or cold water. This could also be an example of Real Science as you are putting a theory into practise.
    By Layla.

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  • We learn real science at Cathedral school when we learn about circuits. This is because we are learning life skills, for example a faulty light bulb these lessons teach you to be able to work out what’s wrong with it. Also when ,maybe, we become engineers, electrician’s or a designer it will be useful to know about a simple circuit as the jobs will include this. I think learning about circuits is really important and it’s good that we learn about it at Cathedral School.

    We learn about child centered science when we do our Science projects. This is as we where given a theme, time limit and a few pointers and then we could just do what we wanted for it. Leaving us to our own investigations and inspiring our creativity. I think this is a really good thing as it helps us figure stuff out for ourselves which means that it is sometimes easier to pick up.

    Then there’s inspiring or exciting science this is when you are inspired by science. Like in Science club we made Lava lamps which inspired me to make them again at home. As well as this we are inspired to look stuff up at home. Maybe if we found something really cool in science and we look something at home.

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  • ‘Real’ Science:
    To me, ‘real’ science is using everyday life to help during the science lesson. ‘Real’ science is something everyone can enjoy both in the classroom and out. An example of a time I used ‘real’ science was when we were in year 5. Esther, a neurobiologist kindly let us have a workshop where we get to learn about different neuro materials and we also got to do a few experiments. This is ‘real’ science because, we got to experiment and experience what life could lead us to especially if we wanted to be a neurobiologist. ‘Real’ science is very useful. This is because, as we learn more and more, in ‘real’ science we do more. As we do more, we apply more to our knowledge in our future life. As we do more in ‘real’ science, because we use everyday life, we understand what we are doing more clearly. To me, this is what I think ‘real’ science overall is to me.

    Inspiring and Exciting:
    To me, inspiring and exciting is when you get to do many activities involved in science. To me, inspiring and exciting science is when we get to learn, but the way we learn is in a different way. The teacher won’t stand and talk, but they help us learn in an exuberant way. ‘Inspiring and ‘Exciting are two words you could describe this way of learning. Inspiring, because you inspire yourself and push yourself to the limit. Exciting, because you get to learn in a more fun way and you do not want to end the lesson. An example of when I used inspiring and exciting learning was I did the school project. I got to learn in a fun and exciting way that I can work but at the same time enjoy. Also -in year 4- we got to have real life animals come n and we got to see and find out about them. This is what inspiring and exciting science is to me.

    Child Centred:
    To me, child centred science is when you get to choose what you want to do and what yo want to learn in the science lesson. Take it like this. The teacher asked you, ”What would you like to do this science lesson?”. This is child centred science because you yourself gets to choose. An example of when I used child centred science was when I was in science club (still in year 6). Mr Morrell asked us what we would like to do for the first week of the autumn term. We got to watch some videos of different science experiments. In the end, we decided to do lava lamps and we got to make them. How is this child centred? This is child centred because the teacher asked us what we wanted to do and not what he planned. At the end, it was very fun and we got to take home lava lamps. This is what I think child centred science is to me.

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  • I feel ‘child centred science’ is relevant to me because we did a science project at school in year 5. My project was on the science of magnets. I found this topic both fascinating and extremely enjoyable.
    I learned the science behind magnetic attraction and magnetic repulsion. For example something that pulls towards you, like a door is one type of force and then as it pushes away from you, this is another type of force. This process is the movement of the door opening and closing, and this can be a similar effect of magnetic attraction and repulsion. Here I am trying to show the behaviour in the science of a magnetic process.
    My understanding of ‘child centred science’ is not always easy to explain and within science there is not always a rule or reason as to why something happens.
    In the classroom, we can be given the equipment required to carry out an experiment and told how to perform this, but it is then up to us to decide how to do it.
    An example of a classroom experiment is when we were given four pieces of card, a torch, ruler, green pen, blue tack and a pencil. On three sheets we had to draw diagonal lines from corner to corner using a pencil, and where all the lines met in the centre of the sheets we had to push the green pen through. Using only the fourth sheet of card we then had to draw a bullseye in the centre of the card. Using the blue tack, split into four pieces we stood each sheet of card into this standing them in a line with the bullseye sheet of card at the end and with that we shone the torch through the front three sheets of card so that the light reached the bullseye. If the light did not shine on the bullseye, the front three sheets had to be rearranged so that the light would hit the bullseye. This science experiment was to show that light travels in a straight line.
    Science has many meanings and explanations to its behaviour and effects, which can be very exciting.
    BY CHARLIR YR6

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  • I feel ‘child centred science’ is relevant to me because we did a science project at school in year 5. My project was on the science of magnets. I found this topic both fascinating and extremely enjoyable.
    I learned the science behind magnetic attraction and magnetic repulsion. For example something that pulls towards you, like a door is one type of force and then as it pushes away from you, this is another type of force. This process is the movement of the door opening and closing, and this can be a similar effect of magnetic attraction and repulsion. Here I am trying to show the behaviour in the science of a magnetic process.
    My understanding of ‘child centred science’ is not always easy to explain and within science there is not always a rule or reason as to why something happens.
    In the classroom, we can be given the equipment required to carry out an experiment and told how to perform this, but it is then up to us to decide how to do it.
    An example of a classroom experiment is when we were given four pieces of card, a torch, ruler, green pen, blue tack and a pencil. On three sheets we had to draw diagonal lines from corner to corner using a pencil, and where all the lines met in the centre of the sheets we had to push the green pen through. Using only the fourth sheet of card we then had to draw a bullseye in the centre of the card. Using the blue tack, split into four pieces we stood each sheet of card into this standing them in a line with the bullseye sheet of card at the end and with that we shone the torch through the front three sheets of card so that the light reached the bullseye. If the light did not shine on the bullseye, the front three sheets had to be rearranged so that the light would hit the bullseye. This science experiment was to show that light travels in a straight line.
    Science has many meanings and explanations to its behaviour and effects, which can be very exciting.
    BY CHARLIE YR6

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  • Real science:
    Real science is when students get an opportunity to find out about different experiment and test out what will happen also it helps because you get to guess what will happen and if you think it will work. At school in class 5 we did a experiment where a friends’ mom came to school to teach us about science.

    I was really excited to do the experiments when they were showing us different slideshows of what we were going to do and what it was about.
    Another example was this year in class 6 when we were experimenting if light can travel in a straight line. There was a lot steps before we had to start the experiment.First we had to get 4 piece of black card and poke a hole through the middle of it. Next we would have to make a target and try to hit the light at the target. After experimenting it worked and i found it fascinating to do.

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  • REAL SCIENCE
    In Catheral school we get to find out what it is like to build circuits if you want to be an engineer . Or if you do not know what you want to do you can just do some experiments like Elephants toothpaste. We are very lucky to do these experiments at Cathedral School because we get to experience what a real life Scientist does.

    CHILD CENTRED
    In Cathedral school we don’t just get the teachers to tell us what to do or what will happen we get to write predictions on what we think will happen. For example we had to write which one we thought would resolve faster in water either sugar or salt and then we tried it to see if we got the answer right.

    INSPIRING AND EXCITING
    In Cathdedral school we also challenge ourselves and push our self so we learn and next time do not make mistakes. At Cathdedral school it is not just working we get hands on experience to complete special experiments that others schools may not have.

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  • “Real Science” asks questions and tries to find the answers to explain “What?” and “Why?” something is – “How?” it became that way and “Can we?” use or influence those answers. eg: Understanding the physics of the universe – or discovering the reasons behind, and a cure for, diseases.

    Child centred science relates discoveries to their lives. eg: Why Global Warming is happening and how we can fix it. Interesting experiments, that can be done by children themselves, will make the science inspiring and exciting. eg: Growing plants in different conditions to see how climate affects them – or visiting a recycling centre to see materials being re-used.

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  • These principals ensure all my lessons are targeted towards me and my class friends.
    I have really enjoyed science at Cathedral school this term, especially learning about rocks and where there come from with Miss Fishwick. Do you know what the scientific term for the science of rocks is called??

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  • Science is one of the most important subjects in school as in secondary school is one of the three main subjects being maths, English and science. At Cathedral school, we always make sure science is fun, engaging and interactive by focusing on the three properties of science: ‘Real’ science -when what we learn in science involves working with realistic situations and using other skills like maths in situations that may help us in our future career choices. Child Centred science – When science is completely (if not mostly) focused around children and what they do. This includes things like making up our own methods and experiments for our investigations. Finally, there is inspiring and exiting science- When science is engaging and interesting to children and adults and where learning is co-operative and fun. To me this means always trying my best and having fun in science and always trying out new things and working together in groups sometimes is how I work best as we all are assigned a different role and a part to play and then we all just get along with it and figure out what to do purse rd. All throughout my journey through Primary school I have had many science lessons where I have made some great memories with my classmates and they are some examples of the three properties of science: Once when I was in year two my class had a lesson that was about circuits and my teacher explained to us how to make a simple circuit and then just let us do the experiment all on our own. I remember how my group used trial and error to try and make a unique circuit and then one- by -one all the table groups went underneath the tables to see the lightbulb light up and then some of us came up with the idea to attempt to connect 3 of our circuits together to make one giant circuit with three lightbulbs and two buzzers. In the end, we managed to make it work in the end and seeing the lightbulb light up was like seeing our own success and it made us excited and happy. This is an example of Chid Centred learning as we made up our very own way to do the experiment. Last year when my class was in year five I remember when a man that worked with animals came in with some reptiles and we got to learn all about reptile life at the same time and learning about each individual animal. We saw an albino Burmese Python which was massive and for our class it took seven children and one teacher to hold! Then we learnt about how snakes shed their skin and what their lifecycle is like and we learnt about other animals too, like tortoises, An Iguana and at one point there was an endangered Rose Hair tarantula which we got to hold! This is an example of inspire and exiting science because we all really enjoyed ourselves seeing and touching the animals and it was a really great experience and a few people said once we had finished the workshop that it made them want to be zookeepers. Another time in year five, was wen Jack’s mum came into school and taught our class about neurons and how animal cells work. There were microscopes where we could see lots of tiny bugs and in one of them there was a bug which brain was glowing and that was due to a certain chemical reaction. There was a puzzle where we had to use tweezers to pull little balls out of a box through a very small hole but we couldn’t look what we were doing and this was very challenging and we were proud if we finished it because it was quite tricky. This is an example of Real science because a team of people came in and taught us things that their job was and in the future that could us inspired us to be scientists as well. These have been my examples of the three properties of science when I was doing science lessons at Cathedral School and I have enjoyed them all ,even the ones that were not listed here and I know that in secondary school science will get even greater.

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  • I really like science because you learn a lot about how food makes us healthy.
    I really like that we get to do loads of experiments where we predict things then test them. We tested our fitness – how many star jumps we could do in a minute.
    I like learning things I never knew before.
    When you learn about how to stay healthy it will help you when you’re older.
    You have fun while you learn because I really enjoyed making a healthy plate and showing it in assembly.
    I like when we thought about how materials feel. I really liked doing that because we got to feel different things.
    When we were in year 1 we had an ice cube and we tested how many minutes it would melt in. With the water, it melted more quickly. There was one on a radiator and the other one was outside.
    We did experiments to see how well cress grew.

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  • I like that we tested the ice in the water and without the water

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  • I really enjoy science because in Yr 1 we did a mini bug hunt and we tested cress and ice,for the ice we tested how long it would take for it to melt and for the cress we tested where it would plant best outside,in the cupboard or by the radiator.

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  • I like science because it’s fun. I like learing about the human body, carnivores, herbivores, omivores, materials and seeing how many star jumps we can do in a minute. I like doing these things because they are fun.

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  • On Thursday our class did real science we went to Red cross gardens and explored insects and bugs to see if they have backbones
    If it did not have a backbone it is a Invertebrate If it has a backbone it is a vertebrate.

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  • Child Centred
    Science is exciting because one day in year 2 we learnt about the properties of materials like how soft they are or how hard they are, how transparent or absorbent they are. And on a piece of paper, we wrote down what we thought.

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  • I really like science because we get to do lots of experiments and sometimes when we predict things and sometimes they are right or wrong and it can be really fun .

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  • I really like science because you get to do amazing unbelievable things that you can try out and have fun with it. Like the time we went to Redcross Gardens to search for invertebrates. It was exciting and fun as well as inspiring.

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  • I liked it when we were in year 1 and we were learning how to grow cress in different ways and I really liked it so much.We also learned how many star jumps we could do in a minute and I really liked it .I really liked it when we were learning about the human body and which part of your body is a organ and it was amazing.

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  • I like when we felt the different mayerial and if it was hard or soft and a couple of them were soft and a bit hard, it was amazing.

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  • Real Science

    At school, I’ve done lots of different projects and work on science but there are a few I’ve really enjoyed-for example- Esther’s science exhibition, the ‘Fruit Planets’ and does light travel in a straight line? These were only some of the experiments my class and I have done and I’ve loved all of them. Some were better than others because you get to interact and work with your class mates and teacher. Also, some other experiments I really like were the coca cola bottles and mints we did in year 5 and the nutrition man we had in year 4 who told us all the Carbohydrates,Protein and Dairy we need in our body to keep us fit and healthy. Although I’ve only written down some of the work from previous years, there is a lot more I can name but would be here for ages and would take me too long to explain!

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  • I think it’s good that every child in Cathedral School gets the opportunity to learn about science.

    My favourite science poem – By Cheri’ane Taylor, Year 3.

    Everything works,
    because of science.
    even your old
    Kitchen appliance.

    What about your mums car?
    without science,
    It wouldn’t go far.

    With science we could make,
    a computer or phone,
    If you want a twin,
    just ask for a clone.

    Science will explain,
    nature and trees,
    It’s also used,
    to find cures for disease.

    Science is cool,
    the evidence is clear,
    it’s so much fun,
    enjoy it my dear.

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  • The principles help us because it means that we could do lots of experiments. We have already done lots.

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  • Science at this school is so experimental. We have had many trips such as the Science Museum and other classes have had some other trips. This school has done many fun and messy experiments with circuits, soap and much more. The fun which we have doing science in this school is so enjoyable and everything that the principles mention are what we do.

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  • I really like doing science at school mostly because there are a lot of explosions and they are really fun!

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  • I love science even more!

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  • I love Science because you learn so many different words and different facts

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  • I really enjoy science at cathedral school. In Year 5 we went on a cool trip to the science museum. My favourite part was going to the Wonder Lab because we got to try out lots of experiments.

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  • A child-centred activity at this school that I enjoyed taking part in was the Science project 2016. It was very interesting looking at the amount of work and information that everyone had put into their work. I loved taking part and working hard on my project. It was very well done by all the teachers that organised it. Thank you for giving me these experiences.

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  • Science is a great. It’s amazing.

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  • I really enjoy doing our science at Cathedral Primary School! I really enjoy interactive science because I find that I learn way more and it is really fun. I really enjoyed our trip to the science museum and found it very fascinating. My favourite part of the trip was the spinning earth in the center of the museum, it was from a satellite view a couple of days ago.

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  • I remember not too long ago we went to the new wonder lab to see astronomic things and saw all the interesting facts about space and who went to space.Then we went to try out different experiments for ourselves.

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  • Child Centered
    This year for a school trip we went to science museum. I found this very child centered because we were allowed to go off and explore inside the new wonder lab

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  • Real

    I get to do real experiments and learn something new each time. When I was in Class 4 I got to experiment with different liquids to make a bubble and I felt like I achieved some real science.

    Child-Centered

    I got to test myself and see what I can do by doing my own project about a famous scientist called Alexander Bell then almost everyone got to see it and I got to see theirs.

    Inspiring and Exciting

    Science is always exciting and this has inspired me to do more experiments which is what I love doing!

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  • Real:

    Once I help build a computer with my dad and we then connected it to a rasberrypie so it went on to the television screen.
    At school,in science club we got to make lava lamps. I made an orange lava lamp and all you had to was put an effervescent tablet in it and it would create a really cool lava lamp effect.
    There was another time where brain experts came into our school and taught us all about brains and how amazing they are, we had stations and got to do different experments to learn even more about the brain.

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  • A child-centred activity at this school that I really enjoyed was the science project 2016. It was a brilliant activity that meant children could work hard to achieve something brilliant. I loved looking at other people’s projects and all the hard work and enthusiasm for the task that they had put in. It is good because it means everyone learns something but not just from their teacher but from other members of their class. I personally really enjoyed it and would encourage people to do it again. Whilst looking and and listening to other people’s projects I learnt more than I had ever learnt before in a normal science lesson. Whether it was about Alexander Graham Bell or the invention of the light bulb, I told lots of interesting facts!

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  • I really like science because its fun and you can experiment with things.

    When we were in Year 1, we did an experiment and saw how long it would take to make our ice cubes melt. First, they started off without water, but then we noticed that the best way was to put water in the cup with them as well, and then our ice cubes melted faster, and we made our own predictions.

    You can test with things that you didn’t know you could test with before.

    You see how things work, and then you can do them by yourself.

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